Research Highlights this Spring

Spring semester brings new social sciences topics for Research Highlights@ Noon at Babbidge Library.

  • Dr. Christian Zimmermann from the Department of Economics begins the spring lineup on February 2nd with a presentation on RePEc, a public-access database for economics research. Rescheduled for Wednesday February 9, 2011.
  • Angela C. White, from the Department of Psychology, will be discussing her research on health-related conspiracy theories on February 22nd .
  • Dr. Catherine Medina from the School of Social Work heralds in March with a presentation on the use of telenovelas in HIV prevention communication on March 1st.

Each presentation will be held in the Class of ’47 Room on the Plaza Level of Babbidge Library. For more information about the speakers and this series visit the Research Highlights at Noon webpage (http://www.lib.uconn.edu/about/researchhighlights/index.html).

Workshop on CIRI Human Rights Data Project, February 3

On Thursday, February 3, 2011 from 2:30-3:30, the UConn Libraries will host a workshop on the CIRI Human Rights Data Project. The workshop will be held in the Class of ’47 Room in Homer Babbidge Library.

David Richards, Associate Professor in Political Science at UConn, and one of the co-creators of CIRI will discuss the dataset and how to use it.  Professor Richards recently received a grant to host the dataset at UConn.

This workshop is open to interested faculty, students, and staff at UConn.  You can register on the Libraries website at http://lib.uconn.edu/instruction/workshop/

More information on resources for human rights research at UConn is available at http://classguides.lib.uconn.edu/humanrights.

Finding Psychological Tests

Finding psychological instruments can be a challenge to researchers. One problem is that there is no single source for finding tests. You may have to search within several sources to find the test you want. Another challenge is that some tests are sold commercially, while other may have been cited in an article without having been made available for purchase. Below you’ll find seven of the most-used sources for locating tests. You can find other sources by referring to UConn Libraries Tests & Measures research guide .

Published Tests

1.       Mental Measurements Yearbook (MMY) database contains information on over 4,000 published tests. MMY does not contain the actual tests.  Each record in MMY tells you the purpose, intended audience, scoring information, price, and provides the publisher contact information. In addition, MMY contains reviews by psychologists that give historical background and explain the validity and reliability of the tests. To access MMY, click the link above and select the link for Mental Measurements Yearbook.  UConn Libraries also has the MMY in print.

2.       Tests in Print (TIP) database is a comprehensive index of all published tests. TIP contains much of the same information as MMY but does not include reviews. To access TIP, use the link above and select Mental Measurements Yearbook and Tests in Print. This is a database which combines the content of MMY and TIP. TIP is also available in print.

3.       Tests is a directory of psychology, education, and business tests. Tests is organized by topic (i.e. relationships, intelligence, pathology-anxiety). Tests contains a short test description, as well as the intended population, format, scoring, and a very brief description. Each volume has an Index of Publishers for locating the necessary contact information. Use this link to find the print volumes in the library: Tests

4.       Test Critiques as the name implies, provides detailed reviews of frequently-used tests in psychology, education, and business. Test Critiques is a multivolume set. Each volume contains an Index of Test Titles, Index of Test Publishers, and a Subject Index. Use this link to find the print volumes in the library: Test Critiques

Unpublished Tests

1.       Tests in Microfiche is a collection of actual unpublished tests. The tests in this collection were developed between 1975 and 2004. Each test is reproduced in microfiche. To search for a test, search the ETS Test Collection database. To search this database:

  • Select the Advanced Search tab
  • Type TIM in the TitleSearch box to search for a test in the Tests in Microfiche collection
  • In the next row of search boxes, enter your subject
  • Once you have identified a test, make a note of the call number. You can then find the test on the third floor of the Microfiche Collection at Babbidge Library.

2.       Health and Psychosocial Instruments (HAPI) database has information on 15,000 published and unpublished psychological instruments.  You cannot find an actual test in HAPI, but you can find a citation to the research which produced the test. To search HAPI:

  • Type your topic
  • For each result, view the Complete Reference
  • Look at the Availability field for information about obtaining the instrument
  • When searching you can also limit your search by checking the Primary Source box to search for records which cite the original source in which the instrument was published.

3.       PsycINFO database is familiar to most as the chief resource for finding abstracts to research in psychology. PsycINFO can be used to find tests by using the following steps:

  • Select Advanced Search
  • In the first row of search boxes, type appended and select TM Tests & Measures from the drop-down menu
  • In the next row, type your topic and select KW Keywords from the drop-down menu

While consulting these sources, keep in mind that you should contact the creator or the copyright holder if you want to use or reproduce a test.

If you need help, contact Dawn Cadogan, Liaison to Psychology and Communication Sciences at Storrs campus / dawn.cadogan@uconn.edu / 486-6976.

New: There will be a workshop on finding psychological tests in HAPI and MMY on Friday, February 18, 2011, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. The class will be held in Electronic Classroom 1 on Level 1 of Babbidge Library. To reserve a seat at this workshop, visit the Uconn Libraries workshops page.