Demographic and Economic Profiles of Connecticut’s Electorate

In advance of the Connecticut primary on April 26, the U.S. Census Bureau presents a variety of statistics that give an overall profile of the state’s voting-age population and industries. Statistics include:

Electorate Profile: Connecticut

 

Per-pupil expenditures by school district, fiscal year 2013

This visualization uses data from the 2013 Annual Survey of School System Finances which provides per-pupil expenditures for various instructional and support services functions for over 13,000 school districts, including salaries, wages, and benefits of instructional staff, as well as administrative, instructional staff support, and other support service costs.

(Note that total per-student expenditures include expenses not included separately in Instruction and Support Services costs (see footnote [1] in original American FactFinder table).

 

Per-pupil spending of public elementary and secondary school systems: Fiscal year 2013

More great data sets seem to be added to the U.S. Census Bureau’s  American FactFinder data engine all the time. This visualization uses data from the 2013 Annual Survey of School System Finances: Per pupil amounts for current spending of public elementary-secondary school systems by state , allowing comparison of expenditures on  instruction and support services among states.

Increases in income inequality within states, 2007-2014

According to the the latest American Community Survey data, the period from 2007 to 2014 saw a statistically significant increase in income inequality – represented by the Gini index – in 32 states. The Gini Index represents the concentration of income in a given state or country, in a range from 0 to 1. A higher Gini index indicates greater inequality – where income is concentrated among a relatively few individuals or households; a lower Gini score represents more even income distribution.

The ACS 1-Year reports the Gini index for households in table B19083 as the middle point of a 90% confidence interval, along with a corresponding margin of error. The visualization below calculates significant change in Gini index scores from 2007-2014 – shifts outside the margin of error. In 32 states, the lower end of the range of the 2014 Gini estimate was greater than the upper range of the 2009 Gini Index estimate. In the remaining states, there was no statistically significant change from 2009 to 2014: in these cases, taking into account the margin of error, the estimates from 2009 overlapped with those from 2014.

Gini index is a commonly used economic measure, reported by organizations such as the World Bank and CIA, in its World Factbook.

WMS Server Outage – 1/27/2016

MAGIC_WMSThe Web Mapping Service (WMS) for the Connecticut State Data Center and MAGIC, a service that provides access to the 1934 aerial photography layer and historical maps for use within GIS applications and is utilized within a number of the interactive map mash-ups for MAGIC will need to be offline part of today (1/27/2016) to resolve connectivity issues with the server. This server experienced an unplanned outage and we are working to resolve this issue ASAP.

During this WMS server update period there may be periods of time when the WMS service could be temporarily unavailable or load times for layers may be impacted.

This maintenance will identify and address additional performance issues with the WMS server and we apologize for the inconvenience any short duration outages of the server may cause.

For users needing access to aerial photography layers via a WMS, the Connecticut Environmental Conditions Online (CT ECO) site offers a WMS with several aerial photography layers which can be accessed at: http://cteco.uconn.edu/map_services.htm

Posted in GIS

Student Survey of Transportation Access to UCONN Stamford Campus, Fall 2015

The following post and data visualization is by guest bloggers Daniel Chiang and James Froehlich, highlighting their project for Prof. Harmon’s Economics service learning class).
This project conducted a survey of the modes of transportation access used by commuters (students, staff and faculty) to the Uconn Stamford Campus in Fall 2015. The survey was conducted during the last 3 weeks of the Fall semester.  Of the 290 Survey Respondents, 213 are undergraduates, which represents 15% of the total Uconn Stamford undergraduate enrollment in Fall 2015.

Our preliminary analysis is focused on the undergraduate students.  We found that 50% of the undergraduate respondents drive to campus.  The drivers primarily use I-95 (46%), 15% use the Merrit, 43% commute via local roads. For 38% the average trip length is 25+ miles one-way.

Across all modes of transportation, for 44% the average length of time for a one-way trip to campus is 40 to 60 minutes, and for 16% the commute time is more than 1 hour.   52% of the undergraduate respondents average four trips to campus per week, and 22% average 5 trips.

Web Mapping Service Maintenance – 12/23/2015

MAGIC_WMSThe Web Mapping Service (WMS) for the Connecticut State Data Center and MAGIC, a service that provides access to the 1934 aerial photography layer and historical maps for use within GIS applications and utilized within a number of the interactive map mash-ups for MAGIC is undergoing maintenance on 12/23/2015. During this maintenance period there may be periods of time when the WMS service could be temporarily unavailable or load times for layers may be impacted.

This maintenance will identify and address performance issues with the WMS server and we apologize for inconvenience any short duration outages of the server may cause.

For users needing access to aerial photography layers via a WMS, the Connecticut Environmental Conditions Online (CT ECO) site offers a WMS with several aerial photography layers which can be accessed at: http://cteco.uconn.edu/map_services.htm

 

Pricing and Usage Characteristics of Railroad Parking Lots Along I 95 Corridor, Lower Fairfield County, CT

(The following post and data visualization is by guest bloggers Patrick GIll, Robert Roig III, and Ryan WIlliams , highlighting their project for Prof. Harmon’s Economics service learning class).

This visualization depicts the prices for permit parking amongst rail station parking lots in Southwestern Connecticut. The data includes rail stations from Greenwich, CT to Greens Farms (Westport), CT. It includes monthly permitted lots as well as those that have annual permits. This visualization gives the ability to look at an individual parking lot’s permit price or all of the parking lots’ prices at once. In order to view an individual lot, select the lot in its respective dropdown filter and select “null” in the other dropdown filter. You also can compare all the monthly or annual lot prices by selecting all in the respective dropdown filter and selecting “null” in the other dropdown filter. The goal of this visualization was to help compare an individual lot’s permit price with that of the other lots by visually showing the lots’ prices side by side to see where a lot’s price sits with the rest of the market.

This visualization depicts the utilization of parking at rail station parking lots and garages in Southwestern Connecticut. The data includes rail stations from Greenwich to Greens Farms (Westport). The data shows the number of empty spaces vs. total number of spaces at each parking lot. The figures are based on utilization counts (performed on different days of the week in 2015.) In order to view parking utilization at an individual lot, select the lot name in the dropdown filter. This will show you total spaces (Green) and empty spaces (Red) at that lot. If you select the “All” option in the dropdown filter, the visualization will show the total sum of all parking spaces in our data set as well as the total number of empty spaces in our data set. The goal of this visualization was to help show how many unused spaces there are at rail station lots which in turn could spark new ideas in order to maximize utilization of rail station parking.

 

Resources for Seniors in Connecticut

(The following post and data visualization is by guest blogger Emily Wilson, highlighting her project for Prof. Harmon’s Economics service learning class).

With the growing size of the aging population in Connecticut, this project highlights  the resources available for this population.  Senior Centers and nursing facilities are scattered throughout the state, with the highest concentrations in the Connecticut River valley.

Future analysis could delve deeper into to the needs of the citizens in the smaller towns, which only offer either a nursing facility or a senior center to ensure that the senior population is receiving a sufficient amount of services.  Additionally, future analysis could also include the proportion of seniors residing in each town in relation to the number and extent of services provided.